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AdvSysCon
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Resolution 1200x2400dpi or 600x600dpi with 8-bit CMYK?

Product Name: WorkCentre 7525/7530/7535/7545/7556
Operating System: Windows 11
What's the scoop? The WorkCentre 7556 specs say "copy resolution 1200 x 2400 dpi". However, someone said that is only for 1-bit (B&W or 1-bit CMY) printing. Supposedly, you can't print all 16000+ CMYK colors on each and every 1200x2400dpi pixel. With 8-bit CMYK, the WC7556 drops down to a lower effective resolution (supposedly 600x600dpi). Maybe a different reduced full-color resolution?

Can someone confirm or deny this? If this isn't rubbish, perhaps there is a document somewhere that discusses this? What's the scoop?
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Miles61257
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Re: Resolution 1200x2400dpi or 600x600dpi with 8-bit CMYK?


@AdvSysCon wrote:
What's the scoop? The WorkCentre 7556 specs say "copy resolution 1200 x 2400 dpi". However, someone said that is only for 1-bit (B&W or 1-bit CMY) printing. Supposedly, you can't print all 16000+ CMYK colors on each and every 1200x2400dpi pixel. With 8-bit CMYK, the WC7556 drops down to a lower effective resolution (supposedly 600x600dpi). Maybe a different reduced full-color resolution?

Can someone confirm or deny this? If this isn't rubbish, perhaps there is a document somewhere that discusses this? What's the scoop?

You actually are always printing at 1200*2400 DPI, because that is what the printer does by hardware.

What you see in the driver is how the jobs are interpreted and ripped.

So the driver takes your job and renders it according to the resolution dropdown (600, 1200 etc) Obviously file size changes massively dependent on which you choose. 1200 is great for text (crisp), 600 is great for images (colors, gradients, saturation). Color issues can and do occur at 1200 (faded, de-saturated), not always, but often enough.

And here is where the real difference is noted. 1200DPI does not equal 1200*1200DPI, they are entirely different measurements.

1200DPI is the amount of dots used to make a digital image appear on screen total within one inch.

1200*2400 is very different, in the CMYK world, unlike the RGB, you divide resolution by the toners.

So with this CMYK device you have the 4 colors, so you divide 2400*1200 by 4.

So each color (CMYK) prints 600*300 DPI, when all 4 colors are laid down, there are 2400*1200 DPI.